January, 2005

CONFESSIONS OF AN ECONOMIC HIT MAN
AN INSIDER'S STORY

Dear Friend of Radio Liberty,

"Don't worry, dad. If they get you, I'll take over where you left off. We need to do this for the grandchildren I hope to give you someday!"
Confessions of an Economic Hit Man [1]

"Breathes there the man with soul so dead
Who never to himself hath said:
'This is my own, my native land'?
Whose heart hath ne're within him burned
As home his footsteps he hath turned,
From wandering on a foreign strand?"
Sir Walter Scott [2]

"War is a racket. It always has been. It is possibly the oldest, easily the most profitable, surely the most vicious. . . . It is the only one in which the profits are reckoned in dollars and the losses in lives. . . .

Only a small 'inside' group knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefit of the very few, at the expense of the very many. Out of war a few people make huge fortunes."
Major General Smedley Butler [3]

"McNamara blared his mission of high purpose in 1973 in Nairobi, initiating the World Bank's crusade on poverty. . . . The result was disaster, draped . . . with obsessive secrecy, empty claims of success and mostly successful efforts to extinguish internal dissent."
Alexander Cockburn: February 2004 [4]

"Economic hit men (EHMs) are highly paid professionals who cheat countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. They funnel money from the World Bank, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), and other foreign "aid" organizations into the coffers of huge corporations and the pockets of a few wealthy families who control the planet's natural resources. Their tools include fraudulent financial reports, rigged elections, payoffs, extortion, sex, and murder."
Confessions of an Economic Hit Man: 2004 [5]

"The book was dedicated to the presidents of two countries, men who had been my clients, whom I respected and thought of as kindred spirits - Jaime Roldos, president of Ecuador, and Omar Torrijos, president of Panama. Both had just died in fiery crashes. Their deaths were not accidental. They were assassinated because they opposed that fraternity of corporate, government, and banking heads whose goal is global empire. We EHMs failed to bring Roldos and Torrijos around, and the other type of hit men, the CIA- sanctioned jackals who were always right behind us, stepped in."
John Perkins: 2004 [6]

I believe the account you are about to read is true. It is a story of greed and intrigue, money and murder, genocide and war. I validated many of the facts on the Internet, in books, and past interviews with ambassadors, military men, and political leaders. John Perkins, who wrote Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, claims he was recruited by the National Security Agency (NSA) and employed by an international energy company (MAIN) that was associated with a sinister group that rules the world. Perkins called them "the corporat-ocracy" because members come from covert government agencies (NSA and CIA), international banks (The World Bank, USAID, the IMF), and international corporations. [7] Confessions of an Economic Hit Man explains:

(1) The senseless wars of the twentieth century.
(2) Why Robert McNamara impoverished Third World countries during his tenure as president of the World Bank.
(3) Why Indonesia, and other undeveloped nations, pay a quarter to a half of their revenues to international banks to service their debt.
(4) The war in Iraq.

John Perkins began writing his book in 1982, but stopped because he was warned, threatened, bribed, and rewarded for concealing what he knew about the corporatocracy. [8] Twenty years later the events of September 11, 2001, motivated him, and he decided to finish his book when his daughter told him:

"Don't worry, dad. If they get you, I'll take over where you left off. We need to do this for the grandchildren I hope to give you someday!" [9]

John Perkins admits he helped the corporatocracy impoverish Third World nations, but he is a patriot, and cherishes the ideals America once represented. Sir Walter Scott immortalized "love of country" when he wrote:

"Breathes there the man with soul so dead
Who never to himself hath said:
'This is my own, my native land'?
Whose heart hath ne'er within him burned
As home his footsteps he hath turned,
From wandering on a foreign strand?
If such there breathe, go mark him well;
For him no minstrel raptures swell;
High though his titles, proud his name,
Boundless his wealth as wish can claim;
Despite those titles, power and pelf,
The wretch concentred all in self,
Living, shall forfeit fair renown,
And, doubly dying, shall go down
To the vile dust from whence he sprung,
Unwept, unhonored, and unsung." [10]

Major General Smedley Butler led contingents of U.S. Marines in dozens of battles in foreign countries before World War I began, and was awarded two Congressional Medals of Honor for valor. General Butler was a patriot, but he realized a small group of evil men controlled U.S. foreign policy, and fomented wars to enrich themselves. He wrote:

"War is a racket. It always has been. It is possibly the oldest, easily the most profitable, surely the most vicious. . . . It is the only one in which the profits are reckoned in dollars and the losses in lives.

A racket is best described . . . as something that is not what it seems to the majority of people. Only a small 'inside group' knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefit of the very few, at the expense of the very many. Out of war a few people make huge fortunes.

In the World War a mere handful garnered the profits of the conflict. . . ." [11]

Many Americans support the war in Iraq because they believe we are fighting terrorism, other Americans oppose the war because they believe the U.S. is fighting for corporate profit, corporate power, and Israel. Initially President Bush claimed the U.S. had to attack Iraq because they had Weapons of Mass Destruction, and were going to use them against us. When no WMDs were found, President Bush said we attacked Iraq because Saddam was working with al-Qaeda. When it became obvious that wasn't true, President Bush announced we invaded Iraq to liberate the people and establish a democracy. Most domestic web sites claim between 16,000 and 18,000 Iraqis have been killed. [12] A study done at the University of Baltimore which was suppressed in the U.S. estimates 100,000 Iraqis have been killed. [13] We may never know the true casualty count, but I fear millions of people will die before the current war ends.

What is taking place? Two opposing forces are battling for control of our government and the world. One group is altruistic, noble, and godly; the other is greedy, ruthless, and evil. Christianity was the dominant force in the United States until 1935; since then evil men have been in control.

Robert Strange McNamara comes from the evil side. When he was Secretary of Defense (1961-1968) he sent millions of young Americans to Southeast Asia to fight, bleed, suffer, and die in the rice paddies of South Vietnam, but wouldn't let our soldiers win the war. When Robert McNamara was president of the World Bank (1968-1981) he lent billions of dollars to corrupt leaders in Third World nations, burdened countries with debt, and impoverished the people. William Clark was vice president of the World Bank during that era. He described McNamara's disastrous program in an article published in Foreign Affairs magazine in the fall of 1981. Did Robert McNamara understand what he was doing? Alexander Cockburn wrote:

"McNamara blared his mission of high purpose in 1973 in Nairobi, initiating the World Bank's crusade on poverty. . . . The result was disaster, draped, as in Vietnam, with obsessive secrecy, empty claims of success and mostly successful efforts to extinguish internal dissent.

At McNamara's direction the bank would prepare five-year 'master country lending plans', set forth in 'country programming papers'. In some cases . . . even ministers of a nation's cabinet could not obtain access to these documents, which in smaller, poorer countries were viewed as international decrees on their economic fate.

Corruption seethed. Most aid vanished into the hands of local elites, who very often used the money to steal the resources - pasture, forest, water - of the very poor whom the bank was professedly seeking to help." [14]

Joseph Stiglitz was the chairman of President Clinton's Council of Economic Advisors for seven years, vice president of the World Bank from 1997 to January 2000, and received the Nobel Prize for Economics in 2001. [15] His book, Globalization and its Discontents, describes the disastrous policies the IMF (and the World Bank) implemented during the late 1990s:

"Decisions were made on the basis of what seemed a curious blend of ideology and bad economics, dogma that sometimes seemed to be thinly veiling special interests. When crises hit, the IMF prescribed outmoded, inappropriate . . . solutions, without considering the effects they would have on the people in the countries told to follow these policies. . . . Alternative opinions were not sought. Open, frank discussion was discouraged. . . . Ideology guided policy prescription and countries were expected to follow the IMF guidelines without debate. . . . Remedies failed as often, or even more often than they worked. . . . The policies designed to help a country adjust to crises . . . led to hunger and riots in many countries; and even when results were not so dire, even when they managed to eke out some growth, . . . often the benefits went disproportion- ately to the better-off, with those at the bottom sometimes facing even greater poverty." [16]

What happened? John Perkins wrote:

"Twenty-four thousand people die every single day because they are unable to obtain life-sustaining food. . . . The income ratio of the one-fifth of the world's population in the wealthiest countries to the one-fifth in the poorest countries went from 30 to 1 in 1960 to 74 to 1 in 1995." [17]

Why did the corporatocracy enrich the wealthy and impoverish the poor? John Perkins explained his job:

"Economic hit men (EHMs) are highly paid professionals who cheat countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. They funnel money from the World Bank, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and other foreign 'aid' organizations into the coffers of huge corporations and the pockets of a few wealthy families who control the planet's natural resources. Their tools include fraudulent financial reports, rigged elections, payoffs, extortion, sex, and murder. They play a game as old as empire, but one that has taken on new and terrifying dimensions during this time of globalization." [18]

"In the years since I first went there (to Ecuador-ed) in 1968, this tiny country had evolved into the quintessential victim of the corporatocracy. My contemporaries and I, and our modern corporate equivalents, had managed to bring it to virtual bankruptcy. We loaned it billions of dollars so it could hire our engineering and construction firms to build projects that would help its richest families. As a result, in those three decades, the official poverty level grew from 50 to 70 percent, under- or unemployment increased from 15 to 70 percent, public debt increased from $240 million to $16 billion, and the share of national resources allocated to the poorest citizens declined from 20 percent to 6 percent. Today, Ecuador must devote nearly 50 percent of its national budget simply to paying off its debts - instead of to helping the millions of its citizens who are officially classified as dangerously impoverished." [19]

John Perkins described his training to be an EHM. He was told:

"'No one can know about your involvement - not even your wife'. . . . I'll teach you all I can during the next weeks. Then you'll have to choose. Your decision is final. Once you're in, you're in for life. . . .

Claudine told me that there were two primary objectives of my work. First, I was to justify huge international loans that would funnel money back to MAIN and other U.S. companies (such as Bechtel, Halliburton, Stone & Webster, and Brown & Root) through massive engineering and construction projects. Second, I would work to bankrupt the countries that received those loans (after they had paid MAIN and the other U.S. contractors. . .) so that they would be forever beholden to their creditors, and so they would present easy targets when we needed favors, including military bases, UN votes, or access to oil and other natural resources. . . ." [20]

The corporatocracy assassinated foreign leaders who wanted to improve the living standards of their people. John Perkins dedicated his book to two of them:

"The book was dedicated to the presidents of two countries, men who had been my clients whom I respected and thought of as kindred spirits - Jaime Roldos, president of Ecuador, and Omar Torrijos, president of Panama. Both had just died in fiery crashes. Their deaths were not accidental. They were assassinated because they opposed that fraternity of corporate, government, and banking heads whose goal is global empire. We EHMs failed to bring Roldos and Torrijos around, and the other type of hit men, the CIA- sanctioned jackals who were always right behind us, stepped in." [21]

If the corporatocracy couldn't assassinate a leader, they fomented a revolution or contrived a reason to attack their country.

"In tiny Guatemala, the Central Intelligence Agency mounted a coup overthrowing the democratically elected government in 1954, and it backed subsequent right-wing governments against small leftist rebel groups for four decades. Roughly 200,000 civilians died.

In Chile, a CIA-supported coup helped put Gen. Augusto Pinochet in power from 1973 to 1990. In Peru, a fragile democratic government is still unraveling the agency's role in a decade of support for the now-deposed and disgraced president, Alberto K. Fujimori . . . .

The United States had to invade Panama in 1989 to topple . . . Manuel A. Noriega, who, for almost 20 years, was a valued informant for American Intelligence." [22]

Why did the U.S. attack Iraq in 1991?

"It hardly mattered that he (Saddam) was a pathological tyrant, that he had the blood of mass murders on his hands, or that his mannerisms and brutal actions conjured images of Adolph Hitler. The United States had tolerated and even supported such men many times before. We would be happy to offer him U.S. government securities in exchange for petrodollars, for the promise of continued oil supplies, and for a deal whereby the interest on those securities was used to hire U.S. companies to improve infrastructure systems throughout Iraq, to create new cities, and to turn the deserts into oases. . . . By the late 1980s it was apparent that Saddam was not buying into the EHM scenario. This was a major frustration and a great embarrassment to the first Bush administration. . . . As Bush searched for a way out, Saddam played into his hands . . . he invaded the oil-rich sheikh- dom of Kuwait." [23]

Why did the United States attack Iraq in 2002? I will cover that subject next month.

Confessions of an Economic Hit Man can be ordered by calling 800-544-8927. I hope to have a 4-tape set of interviews with Mr. Perkins you can share with your friends.

Our audience is growing, and another station is broadcasting our Saturday program.

Steven Roach, the chief economist at Morgan Stanley, fears the United States has a 90% chance of facing a "financial Armageddon." I suggest you get out of debt, and prepare for difficult times.

I close this letter with Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem, A Psalm of Life:

"Tell me not, in mournful numbers,
Life is but an empty dream! -
For the soul is dead that slumbers,
And things are not what they seem.

Life is real! Life is earnest!
And the grave is not its goal;
Dust thou art, to dust returnest,
Was not spoken of the soul. . . .

Lives of great men all remind us
We can make our lives sublime,

And, departing, leave behind us
Footprints on the sands of time.

Footprints, that perhaps another,
Sailing o'er life's solemn main,
A forlorn and shipwrecked brother,
Seeing, shall take heart again.

Let us then be up and doing,
With a heart for any fate;
Still achieving, still pursuing,
Learn to labor and to wait." [24]

Our job is to labor in the fields, and wait for God to reap the harvest.

We have the unique opportunity to get a printing of Brotherhood of Darkness at an excellent price. If we can get a good number of people who would like to purchase a case of 62 books for $124.00 plus shipping (and tax in California) we can get the printing fee dramatically reduced. We would like to be able to make this offer to allow people who have enjoyed the book to pass it on to others. It will be a one-time offer, but we thought it would be an excellent opportunity to be able to pass the savings on to the people who have been such a wonderful support for Radio Liberty.

We will also be offering our programs on CD in the very near future. We are just working out some of the final details. We will be sending out more information with the next letter, but if you are interested in the CDs we would appreciate hearing from you so we can make adjustments in our production schedule. This will also apply to our tape-of-the-month selections.

I appreciate your faithful support, and your prayers.

Yours in Christ,

Stanley Monteith



REFERENCES

1. John Perkins, Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc., San Francisco, 2004, p. x.
2. Roy Cook, One Hundred and One Famous Poems, "Love of Country," Reilly & Lee, Chicago, 1958, p. 110.
3. Smedley D. Butler, War is a Racket, The Noontide Press, Torrance, CA, 1984, p. 9.
4. www.counterpunch.org/cockburn02072004.html
5. Perkins, op. cit., p. ix.
6. Ibid.
7. Ibid., dust cover and p. 217.
8. Ibid., op. cit., p. ix.
9. Ibid., p. x.
10. Roy Cook, op. cit., p. 110.
11. Smedley D. Butler, op.cit.
12. www.antiwar.com/casualties/
13. Elisabeth Rosenthal, "Study Puts Iraqi Deaths of Civilians at 100,000," International Herald Tribune, October 29, 2004.
14. www.counterpunch.org/cockburn02072004.html
15. Joseph E. Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents, W.W. Norton & Company, New York, 2003, dust cover and front flap of dust cover.
16. Ibid., pp xiii-xiv.
17. Perkins, op. cit., pp. x and 206.
18. Ibid., p. ix.
19. Ibid., p,. 203.
20. Ibid., pp. 14-15.
21. Ibid., p. ix.
22. Ibid., p. 200.
23. Ibid., pp. 183-184.
24. Roy Cook, op. cit., "A Psalm of Life," p. 123.


Return to Radio Liberty home page